Least Developed Countries Group Push for Decisive Climate Action at United Nations General Assembly

23 September – At the UN General Assembly in New York, the Least Developed Countries (LDC) Group calls on heads of state and government to reaffirm their pledge to tackle climate change by committing to fair and concrete climate solutions to protect all people and the planet. The theme of this year’s UN General Assembly debate – ‘Focusing on People: Striving for Peace and a Decent Life for All on a Sustainable Planet’ – is a reminder of the importance of safeguarding a liveable world for ourselves and future generations.  Continue reading

LDC Watch session at WTO Public Forum in Geneva on 26 Sept

(13 September 2017): LDC Watch, the umbrella group representing NGOs from Least Developed Countries, is holding a working session on ‘An Inclusive Global Trade System In The Face of Changing Trade Landscape’ at the WTO Public Forum. It is Working Session 6, on Tuesday, 26 September, 11.30-13.00 in Room D, at the WTO Building, Geneva. The general theme of the Public Forum 17, (26-28 September) is ‘Trade Behind the Headlines’ on making trade work for more people and ensure that the trading system is as inclusive as possible. Continue reading

Development deficit feeds Boko Haram in northern Cameroon

7 September Mbom Sixtus (IRIN), One of the main reasons Boko Haram has been able to gain a foothold and recruit thousands of young people in the Far North Region of Cameroon is its relative lack of development and employment opportunities. Since Boko Haram began to launch attacks in northern Cameroon in 2014, more than 2,000 people have been killed and at least 155,000 forced to flee their homes. Continue reading

Early results: Did private outsourcing improve Liberia’s schools?

  An independent evaluation of a project in Liberia that outsourced the management of nearly 100 schools to mostly international private operators has revealed that student learning improved by up to 60 percent during its first year. However, the evaluation also raised serious concerns about the financial sustainability and cost effectiveness of the program, and the privatisation of education.

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Tackle climate change LDC Group tells leaders in run-up to G7 meeting

As G20 leaders prepare to meet in Hamburg on 7-8 July 2017, the Least Developed Countries (LDC) Group calls on heads of state and government to reaffirm their commitments to tackling climate change by committing to ambitious climate action and support for the most vulnerable countries. The theme of Germany’s G20 presidency is ‘Shaping an Interconnected World’. This is extremely relevant to the issue of climate change: a truly global problem requiring a global, collaborative solution.  Continue reading

Regional Consultation of West African CSOs on from LDCs

22 June, Dakar, Senegal: The regional consultation of West African LDCs on graduation from LDC Criteria in reference to the IPoA and the Agenda 2030 took place in Dakar, Senegal on 21 and 22nd June 2017. It was attended by representatives from CSOs and progressive experts of West African Least Developed Countries (LDCs). The meeting, jointly organized by LDC Watch and ARCADE concentrated on four thematic areas, vital for West African LDCs: Poverty, Conflict and Development , Climate Change and Adaptation: Agriculture , Food Security and Food Sovereignty and Trade, Technology Transfer and International Cooperation. Continue reading

Least Developed Countries say Trump disregarding millions of lives across the world

Least Developed Countries have accused US President Donald Trump of showing disregard for the lives of millions of people around the world. Their comment as a bloc in the UN climate process is in response to his Thursday announcement on pulling the US out of the Paris climate accord. Continue reading

Southern NGOs join with with Northern NGOs in condemning Trump’s withdrawal from Paris Agreement

(1st June 2017) As Donald Trump finally announced his long-awaited decision for the U.S. to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, civil society representatives and social movement leaders from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the United States vowed to build people power to address the climate crisis.

“The U.S. pull-out from the Paris Agreement should be strongly condemned and denounced by all peoples of the world. Not because the Paris Agreement is perfect, certainly not because the Paris Agreement will save the world from climate catastrophe.  But because a U.S. pull-out reveals utter disregard for the fate of humanity in favor of continued hegemony of U.S. elites and big corporate interests. Not to mention a tyrannical refusal to accept scientific findings.” Lidy Nacpil, Asian Peoples Movement on Debt and Development

 

“As climate justice movements we stand in solidarity with frontline communities and environmental defenders in the U.S. who have been struggling to ensure the U.S. government takes action on climate change since long before the Paris Agreement. In that spirit of solidarity we call on people everywhere to show up wherever Mr. Trump goes to tell him that his hatred and fear are not welcome in our countries, while we continue to force our own governments to keep fossil fuels in the ground and ensure a just transition for workers.”  Antonio Zambrano Allende, Movimiento Ciudadano frente al Cambio Climático (MOCICC)

 

“With the plan by Trump to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement, people power and international solidarity are the only hope we have of averting an unimaginable climate crisis which will fan the flames of every existing inequality and injustice. It will take all of us around the world, organising together, to hold the historic emitters like the U.S. under the watch of Donald Trump to account and ensure our governments also do their fair share of climate action in the next four years to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees. Trump’s decision doesn’t change that.”

Mithika Mwenda, Pan-African Climate Justice Alliance (PACJA)

 

“Thanks to historic U.S. pollution, we are already suffering the consequences of a rapidly warming world with droughts, fires, and floods wreaking havoc with livelihoods and lives, even displacing whole communities. Trump wants to add to that historic pollution and condemn present and future generations in the global south to further suffering and death. We cannot allow this, there must be forceful political, legal, and economic consequences levied against the U.S. Trump must realise that in the case of climate, nature has the trump card and not him and his cronies!” Sreedhar Ramamurthi, Environics India

 

“Climate change is not waiting for U.S. action and neither can the rest of the world. Trump has turned the U.S. into a rogue climate state and the world should use economic and diplomatic pressure to compel the U.S. to do its fair share. The majority of Americans do not support Trump and his fossil fuel agenda that puts corporate profits above people. The struggle to create real, deep change continues in the U.S. The resistance to Trump is strong and it is growing.” Ben Schreiber, Friends of the Earth USA

 

“Our justified outrage at Trump should not blind us to the destructive policies that he pursued before he got out of Paris, and that are still being pursued by many countries that remain parties to the Paris Agreement. Germany, for example, long feted as a champion of international climate politics, is not world leader in renewable energies, but in fact world leader in digging up and burning lignite, the dirtiest of all the fossil fuels. The struggle for climate justice remains one that must be fought at all levels: from the global, all the way to the local. Trump pulling out of Paris only reinforces the key message: if we want to protect the climate, we can’t wait for our governments to do so. We’ve got to do it ourselves.”  Tadzio Mueller, Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung

 

“I am ashamed of my country’s persistent role in undermining efforts to create a strong and binding agreement, now culminating in Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Here in the U.S. climate justice activists are scrambling hard to find a path forward from within.  We hope our allies will let their voices be heard at U.S. embassies – to both isolate Donald Trump and his ilk – and apply pressure on the U.S. to step up and take responsibility for real and equitable solutions to the escalating climate catastrophe.” Rachel Smolker, BiofuelWatch USA

 

“The Climate Justice Alliance has historically struggled to assure that Indigenous people, women, human rights and a Just Transition are at the forefront of international climate agreements. The shortcomings of the Paris Accord – and Trump’s erroneous and embarrassing decision to withdraw the U.S. from the agreement – proves more than ever that communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis are the ones to lead us toward a renewable and regenerative future. We will continue to organize for climate justice and stand in solidarity with our international allies who are fighting for survival, resisting extraction, and creating solutions from the ground up.” Angela Adrar, Climate Justice Alliance USA

Bonn talks on climate change: We must limit raises to 1.5C to save lives and livelihoods, sas LDC group

18 May 2017:  At the conclusion of the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Chair of the Least Developed Countries (LDC) group, Gebru Jember Endalew, said “The LDC emphasise that the global response to climate change must be consistent with the best available science. We must limit warming to 1.5˚C to protect lives and livelihoods, and this means peaking global emissions in 2020. Less than three years remain to bend the emissions curve down.”

“Climate change impacts are already striking all corners of the world, and are anticipated to grow substantially over the next few decades. The longer we wait, the more costly adaptation, loss and damage, and mitigation will become. We risk undermining our efforts to eradicate poverty and keep in line with our sustainable development goals.”

“The LDCs are concerned that we are still far from addressing actual finance needs of developing countries, whose Nationally Determined Contributions tell us that we need to find trillions not billions. Mobilising climate finance is crucial for LDCs and other developing countries to implement the Paris Agreement.”

“The LDCs are pleased that some valuable progress was made during this conference but we are not moving fast enough. This November at COP23 we must make considerable progress towards finalising the ‘rulebook’ that will implement the Paris Agreement without a last minute rush. The LDCs look forward to continuing our work to produce concrete outcomes.”

“The LDCs call on all Parties to redouble their efforts to tackle climate change with the urgency the climate crisis demands. The livelihoods of present and future generations hang in the balance and depend on all countries taking fair and ambitious action.”

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