COP22: Governments must start cutting emissions now if Paris Agreement has any chance of success, says a new report out today

eac_logo_web_0(Marrakech, 11 November) – As government ministers meet in Marrakech to assess global ambition towards addressing climate change in the near-term, a diverse coalition of social movements, including LDC watch, an umbrella group of NGOs from civil society, released a startling new report, Setting the Path towards 1.5°C Continue reading

COP22: What’s in it for Least Developed Countries at the climate talks in Marrakesh?

ldcwatvh-logoLDC Watch statement, 9-11-16: “Finance is the key” to mitigate the effects of climate change on Least Developed Countries, and help them adapt to the threats it poses,” said LDC Watch, the umbrella group of civil society organisations in Least Developed Countries, at the start of the UN Meeting on Climate Change in Marrakesh. Continue reading

COP22 How wealthy countries are avoiding helping the world’s poorest cope

Ian Johnston, Independent, 6-11-2916: On the eve of the climate change meeting in Marrakesh, starting Monday, 7 November, a new report details how the world’s wealthiest countries are paying far less money to the poorest nations to help them cope with the effects of climate change than they claim. Continue reading

COP22 – Civil society demands increasing ambition and equity

dcj-logo-256x256pxCivil society organisations united under the banner of the Climate Justice campaign issued their demands on the eve of the Marrakesh meeting.

“The Paris Agreement passed the threshold for entry into force earlier than anticipated after being ratified by 55 countries representing 55% of global greenhouse gas emissions on October 4th,, so the Agreement will enter into force on 4th November and the Marrakech meeting will also host the first Meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement (CMA). Continue reading

Least Developed Countries Call for ‘Ambitious Action’ at COP22

climate-changeThe chair of the Least Developed Countries group, Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, called for “fair and ambitious action” Monday at the next round of international climate change negotiations which begin on Nov. 7 in Marrakech, Morocco. Mpanu-Mpanu, from the Democratic Republic of Congo on climate issues, said that the next round of UN climate talks, COP22, must be “an action and implementation COP” and “construct robust rules to support the [Paris] Agreement’s implementation.” Continue reading

Climate Doomsday – a step closer?

climate-change-and-agricultureBaher Kamal Oct 27 2016 (IPS) – Almost inadvertently, humankind is getting closer everyday to the point of no-return towards what could be called the ‘climate doomsday’. Globally averaged concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has surged again to new records in 2016… and will not dip below pre-2015 levels for many generations. Continue reading

LDC Group of countries outlines its priorities for COP22 meeting

less-developed-countries-1-728In the run-up to the COP22 in Marrakesh, the group of 48 LDC countries outline the priorities they will be pushing for at COP22. These cover mitigation, adaptation, Loss and Damage, finance, Capacity building and Technology Development and Transfer, tranparency framework, global stocktake and compliance. Continue reading

Developing countries release $100B Climate Finance Roadmap for 2020

tuvalu-climate-changeOctober 21- 2016 Han Chen Jake Schmidt, National Resources Defence Coucil: This week developed countries released a “Roadmap” for how they will mobilise climate finance between now and 2020. This funding will help developing countries build low carbon and climate resilient economies and is an integral part of the Paris Agreement where countries agreed to mobilise $100 billion annually from 2020 to 2025.   Continue reading

Climate change: temperature rises must be kept to 1.5C if LDCs are to survive

haiti-hurricane11 October 2016, John Vidal, Guardian: As the climate agreement is ratified, developing nations warn that money pledged is still nowhere near enough to adapt to expected sea level rises. Back-slapping for the speed at which the Paris agreement on climate change has been ratified is being tempered by the reality that the new treaty will not stop catastrophic warming, and the money so far pledged by rich countries is nowhere near enough to allow developing countries to adapt to expected sea level rises and more extreme weather. Continue reading